You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘brown marmorated stink bug’ tag.

From the Wall Street Journal on October 20

The reopening of the federal government couldn’t come soon enough for the war on stink bugs, whose reeking legions used the shutdown to solidify their grip on the nation’s capital.

Read the rest of this entry »

Calling all insect enthusiasts and frustrated gardeners!  USDA scientists need your help in documenting Brown Marmorated Stink Bugs (BMSB) in your home. Beginning September 15th through October 15th, we’re asking citizens across the Mid-Atlantic region of the United States to record daily counts of this pest on the exterior of their homes, along with their location and the time of each count. While USDA scientists are focusing on the Mid-Atlantic region, any data they can get from other U.S. regions would also be helpful to their research.

Read the rest of this entry »

The National Science Foundation has funded an Industry-University Cooperative Research Center that will explore new strategies for managing insect pests that devastate crops and harm human health.

Read the rest of this entry »

NOTE: the description of the brown marmorated stink bug is of the nymph, not the adult.

From National Public Radio

With its pleasant climate, Florida has become home to more exotic and invasive species of plants and animals than any other state in the continental U.S. Some invasive species have been brought in deliberately, such as the Burmese python or the Cuban brown snail. But the majority of species are imported inadvertently as cargo.

Read the rest of this entry »

Brown Marmorated Stink Bugs, by Anne Nielsen of Rutgers University: Brown Marmorated Stink Bug is a highly pervasive pest that can cause severe losses for both conventional and organic growers in a wide variety of crops. This webinar will cover background information on BMSB biology and population ecology including identification and distribution. It will include a preliminary discussion of management tactics that are amenable to organic production systems including organic insecticides and biological control; however, this webinar will be primarily about the biology of the insect and will introduce an OREI research project led by Rutgers University. Future webinars will discuss management in more detail.

Register at http://www.extension.org/pages/67200

After 41 years in the business, one might think that an entomologist would run out of new things to talk about.

Not so, says Ron Smith, long-time Auburn University Extension entomologist, who says there’s always something new and different in the world of crop insects.

Read the rest of this entry »

By Dennis O’Brien
January 7, 2013

First detected in the United States a decade ago, the brown marmorated stink bug (BMSB) is now in at least 39 states, is wreaking havoc in homes and gardens, and is a major economic threat to orchard fruits, garden vegetables and row crops. It’s no wonder the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) ranks this pest as its top “invasive insect of interest.”

Read the rest of this entry »

From Southeast Farm Press

The brown marmorated stink bug (BMSB) is wreaking havoc in U.S. homes, gardens, and agricultural operations, causing personal and economic woe.

Agricultural Research Service scientists are exploring various aspects of monitoring and control of this increasingly important insect pest, which is an invasive Asian species known as a sporadic pest of many tree fruit crops in China, Korea, and Japan.

Read the rest of this entry »

By Dennis O’Brien
January 7, 2013

First detected in the United States a decade ago, the brown marmorated stink bug (BMSB) is now in at least 39 states, is wreaking havoc in homes and gardens, and is a major economic threat to orchard fruits, garden vegetables and row crops. It’s no wonder the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) ranks this pest as its top “invasive insect of interest.”

Read the rest of this entry »

With the holiday season gearing up, Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service entomologists are urging travelers to be wary of a new species of unwelcome six-legged hitchhikers itching to become full-time Texans.

Read the rest of this entry »

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 661 other followers